22nd April, 2014

Today is some dork Dai’s birthday. He’s 28, which means for exactly one week he is 2 years older than me (and then I roll in 27… help….)
It’s the second year that we’ve been apart for our “birthday week”. No gifts this year because cancer is expensive, plus we’ll be seeing each other at the beginning of May.
His feelings on turning 28: “I’m really happy to get old. Forever the same age means ‘dead’ 笑 When I get back to [our town], maybe I’ll have special powers like a super hero 笑”
I SOMEHOW managed not to say ‘you’ll always be my super hero!!!’ in fear I would die of corniness forever.
I cried a little today because he’s been so hopeful recently. lol I’m a big old baby.

Today is some dork Dai’s birthday. He’s 28, which means for exactly one week he is 2 years older than me (and then I roll in 27… help….)

It’s the second year that we’ve been apart for our “birthday week”. No gifts this year because cancer is expensive, plus we’ll be seeing each other at the beginning of May.

His feelings on turning 28: “I’m really happy to get old. Forever the same age means ‘dead’ 笑 When I get back to [our town], maybe I’ll have special powers like a super hero 笑”

I SOMEHOW managed not to say ‘you’ll always be my super hero!!!’ in fear I would die of corniness forever.

I cried a little today because he’s been so hopeful recently. lol I’m a big old baby.

22nd April, 2014

でも本当は、気がめいるのはがんの副作用じゃない。死の副作用だ。(がんも死の副作用のひとつだ。ほとんどうなんだってそう。)
But, in fact, depression is not a side effect of cancer. It’s a side effect of dying. (Cancer is also a side effect of dying. Almost everything is, really.) 

でも本当は、気がめいるのはがんの副作用じゃない。死の副作用だ。(がんも死の副作用のひとつだ。ほとんどうなんだってそう。)

But, in fact, depression is not a side effect of cancer. It’s a side effect of dying. (Cancer is also a side effect of dying. Almost everything is, really.) 

21st April, 2014

littlebluecaboose:

cosmictuesdays:

frenchie-fries:

vergess:

boltonsrepairshop:

PSA - PLEASE READ AND SPREAD HE WORD!!!
IF YOU SEE THIS PLANT AT ALL, DO NOT TOUCH IT!!!
Giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum) is an invasive herb in the carrot family which was originally brought to North America from Asia and has since become established in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Northwest regions of the United States. Giant hogweed grows along streams and rivers and in fields, forests, yards and roadsides, and a giant hogweed plant can reach 14 feet or more in height with compound leaves up to 5 feet in width.
Giant Hogweed sap contains toxic chemicals known as Furanocoumarins. When these chemicals come into contact with the skin and are exposed to sunlight, they cause a condition called Phytophotodermatitis, a reddening of the skin often followed by severe blistering and burns. These injuries can last for several months, and even after they have subsided the affected areas of skin can remain sensitive to light for years. Furanocoumarins are also carcinogenic and teratogenic, meaning they can cause cancer and birth defects. The sap can also cause temporary (or even permanent) blindness if introduced into the eyes.  If someone comes into physical contact with Giant Hogweed, the following steps should be taken:
Wash the affected area thoroughly with soap and COLD water as soon as possible.
Keep the exposed area away from sunlight for 48 hours.
If Hogweed sap gets into the eyes, rinse them with water and wear sunglasses.
See a doctor if any sign of reaction sets in.

If a reaction occurs, the early application of topical steroids may lessen the severity of the reaction and ease the discomfort. The affected area of skin may remain sensitive to sunlight for a few years, so applying sun block and keeping the affected area shielded from the sun whenever possible are sensible precautions

PLEASE, DO NOT JUST READ AND SCROLL! THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT AND POTENTIALLY LIFE-SAVING INFORMATION!!!

Extra note: if you live in Oregon, New Jersey, Michigan or New York and see one of these, call your state’s department of agriculture to report it, and trained professionals will come kill it before it can produce seeds and spread.
Frankly, if you see one in general, probably call your DOA and see if there’s a program in place.
Do not burn it, because the smoke will give you the same reaction.
If for some ungodly reason there isn’t a professional who can handle it for you (and please, please use a professional), the DOA of New York has [this guide] for how to deal with it yourself.

OH MY FUCK I HAVE THESE IN MY BACKYARD.

Fucking invasives. Signal boost.

Re-reblogging because I checked Snopes, and not only is this shit true, but the text on this is pretty much the same as it is there! Stay safe, kiddos.

Just wanted to add a note for readers in Japan:
There is a variety of this plant here too. It’s very common in Hokkaido and is called エゾニュウ (ezo nyuu), aka angelica ursina. It’s stalk is often eaten together with other sansai (mountain veggies). It’s easy to spot because it’s huge, and can grow to be 3 meters (9 ft) tall. They have tall, thin stalks with explosions of flowers on the top.
HOWEVER unlike hogweed you don’t have to freak out. It has the same chemical that can cause the horrible reactions, but lots of people handle it without incident. Still, unless you have experience, you might want to avoid it in case you’re sensitive to it.  littlebluecaboose:

cosmictuesdays:

frenchie-fries:

vergess:

boltonsrepairshop:

PSA - PLEASE READ AND SPREAD HE WORD!!!
IF YOU SEE THIS PLANT AT ALL, DO NOT TOUCH IT!!!
Giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum) is an invasive herb in the carrot family which was originally brought to North America from Asia and has since become established in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Northwest regions of the United States. Giant hogweed grows along streams and rivers and in fields, forests, yards and roadsides, and a giant hogweed plant can reach 14 feet or more in height with compound leaves up to 5 feet in width.
Giant Hogweed sap contains toxic chemicals known as Furanocoumarins. When these chemicals come into contact with the skin and are exposed to sunlight, they cause a condition called Phytophotodermatitis, a reddening of the skin often followed by severe blistering and burns. These injuries can last for several months, and even after they have subsided the affected areas of skin can remain sensitive to light for years. Furanocoumarins are also carcinogenic and teratogenic, meaning they can cause cancer and birth defects. The sap can also cause temporary (or even permanent) blindness if introduced into the eyes.  If someone comes into physical contact with Giant Hogweed, the following steps should be taken:
Wash the affected area thoroughly with soap and COLD water as soon as possible.
Keep the exposed area away from sunlight for 48 hours.
If Hogweed sap gets into the eyes, rinse them with water and wear sunglasses.
See a doctor if any sign of reaction sets in.

If a reaction occurs, the early application of topical steroids may lessen the severity of the reaction and ease the discomfort. The affected area of skin may remain sensitive to sunlight for a few years, so applying sun block and keeping the affected area shielded from the sun whenever possible are sensible precautions

PLEASE, DO NOT JUST READ AND SCROLL! THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT AND POTENTIALLY LIFE-SAVING INFORMATION!!!

Extra note: if you live in Oregon, New Jersey, Michigan or New York and see one of these, call your state’s department of agriculture to report it, and trained professionals will come kill it before it can produce seeds and spread.
Frankly, if you see one in general, probably call your DOA and see if there’s a program in place.
Do not burn it, because the smoke will give you the same reaction.
If for some ungodly reason there isn’t a professional who can handle it for you (and please, please use a professional), the DOA of New York has [this guide] for how to deal with it yourself.

OH MY FUCK I HAVE THESE IN MY BACKYARD.

Fucking invasives. Signal boost.

Re-reblogging because I checked Snopes, and not only is this shit true, but the text on this is pretty much the same as it is there! Stay safe, kiddos.

Just wanted to add a note for readers in Japan:
There is a variety of this plant here too. It’s very common in Hokkaido and is called エゾニュウ (ezo nyuu), aka angelica ursina. It’s stalk is often eaten together with other sansai (mountain veggies). It’s easy to spot because it’s huge, and can grow to be 3 meters (9 ft) tall. They have tall, thin stalks with explosions of flowers on the top.
HOWEVER unlike hogweed you don’t have to freak out. It has the same chemical that can cause the horrible reactions, but lots of people handle it without incident. Still, unless you have experience, you might want to avoid it in case you’re sensitive to it. 

littlebluecaboose:

cosmictuesdays:

frenchie-fries:

vergess:

boltonsrepairshop:

PSA - PLEASE READ AND SPREAD HE WORD!!!

IF YOU SEE THIS PLANT AT ALL, DO NOT TOUCH IT!!!

Giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum) is an invasive herb in the carrot family which was originally brought to North America from Asia and has since become established in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Northwest regions of the United States. Giant hogweed grows along streams and rivers and in fields, forests, yards and roadsides, and a giant hogweed plant can reach 14 feet or more in height with compound leaves up to 5 feet in width.

Giant Hogweed sap contains toxic chemicals known as Furanocoumarins. When these chemicals come into contact with the skin and are exposed to sunlight, they cause a condition called Phytophotodermatitis, a reddening of the skin often followed by severe blistering and burns. These injuries can last for several months, and even after they have subsided the affected areas of skin can remain sensitive to light for years. Furanocoumarins are also carcinogenic and teratogenic, meaning they can cause cancer and birth defects. The sap can also cause temporary (or even permanent) blindness if introduced into the eyes.

If someone comes into physical contact with Giant Hogweed, the following steps should be taken:
  • Wash the affected area thoroughly with soap and COLD water as soon as possible.
  • Keep the exposed area away from sunlight for 48 hours.
  • If Hogweed sap gets into the eyes, rinse them with water and wear sunglasses.
  • See a doctor if any sign of reaction sets in.
If a reaction occurs, the early application of topical steroids may lessen the severity of the reaction and ease the discomfort. The affected area of skin may remain sensitive to sunlight for a few years, so applying sun block and keeping the affected area shielded from the sun whenever possible are sensible precautions
PLEASE, DO NOT JUST READ AND SCROLL! THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT AND POTENTIALLY LIFE-SAVING INFORMATION!!!

Extra note: if you live in Oregon, New Jersey, Michigan or New York and see one of these, call your state’s department of agriculture to report it, and trained professionals will come kill it before it can produce seeds and spread.

Frankly, if you see one in general, probably call your DOA and see if there’s a program in place.

Do not burn it, because the smoke will give you the same reaction.

If for some ungodly reason there isn’t a professional who can handle it for you (and please, please use a professional), the DOA of New York has [this guide] for how to deal with it yourself.

OH MY FUCK I HAVE THESE IN MY BACKYARD.

Fucking invasives. Signal boost.

Re-reblogging because I checked Snopes, and not only is this shit true, but the text on this is pretty much the same as it is there! Stay safe, kiddos.

Just wanted to add a note for readers in Japan:

There is a variety of this plant here too. It’s very common in Hokkaido and is called エゾニュウ (ezo nyuu), aka angelica ursina. It’s stalk is often eaten together with other sansai (mountain veggies)It’s easy to spot because it’s huge, and can grow to be 3 meters (9 ft) tall. They have tall, thin stalks with explosions of flowers on the top.

HOWEVER unlike hogweed you don’t have to freak out. It has the same chemical that can cause the horrible reactions, but lots of people handle it without incident. Still, unless you have experience, you might want to avoid it in case you’re sensitive to it. 

(via The Intermediate Stage)

21st April, 2014

Ahahaha oh man, today at school, aw jeeze. So this teacher I’ve never worked with before (but has been teaching younger gradesl) comes in and is like,

"so for class today, I thought I’d pretend to be a foreigner, the kids love it lol…." and he whips out this fake plastic nose and wig and I’m just dying, seriously.

I mean of course we’re adults so I told him to hold off for now, and after class I took him aside and we had a nice convo about how kids that young are still forming their world view, and need to see foreign people as humans and not characters, etc. etc. and he totally got it, apologized, and it’s all cool.

But I was still pretty surprised. You’d think after 5 years these teachers wouldn’t have any more ways of surprising me, but jeeze. I’m often one of the first to say “think about the cultural divide!!”, sometimes too readily I think, but honestly I can’t see how someone can think of dressing up as another race as a joke and a cool fun thing.

21st April, 2014

Easter came and went, and I was too busy to even post! I met with an ALT friend and together we went to church and then cooked this citrus-roasted tofu recipe in her little convection oven (even though we didn’t follow the recipe all that well)
It went much better than expected! Also made me totally want to buy an oven.  Easter came and went, and I was too busy to even post! I met with an ALT friend and together we went to church and then cooked this citrus-roasted tofu recipe in her little convection oven (even though we didn’t follow the recipe all that well)
It went much better than expected! Also made me totally want to buy an oven.  Easter came and went, and I was too busy to even post! I met with an ALT friend and together we went to church and then cooked this citrus-roasted tofu recipe in her little convection oven (even though we didn’t follow the recipe all that well)
It went much better than expected! Also made me totally want to buy an oven. 

Easter came and went, and I was too busy to even post! I met with an ALT friend and together we went to church and then cooked this citrus-roasted tofu recipe in her little convection oven (even though we didn’t follow the recipe all that well)

It went much better than expected! Also made me totally want to buy an oven. 

18th April, 2014

Finally got to try those pudding flavor KitKats. I was intrigued by the bag’s claim that you can cook them in a toaster oven and they would still be edible, rather than a mushy pile of melted chocolate, Of course I had to try it out.
The verdict: yum. They surprisingly don’t melt, and instead become like pudding cookies. It reminds me a bit of creme brulee with its crispy pudding flavor. 
… of course, in the end I was too lazy to toast any more and I ate the rest of the bag as-is (ha ha).  Finally got to try those pudding flavor KitKats. I was intrigued by the bag’s claim that you can cook them in a toaster oven and they would still be edible, rather than a mushy pile of melted chocolate, Of course I had to try it out.
The verdict: yum. They surprisingly don’t melt, and instead become like pudding cookies. It reminds me a bit of creme brulee with its crispy pudding flavor. 
… of course, in the end I was too lazy to toast any more and I ate the rest of the bag as-is (ha ha).  Finally got to try those pudding flavor KitKats. I was intrigued by the bag’s claim that you can cook them in a toaster oven and they would still be edible, rather than a mushy pile of melted chocolate, Of course I had to try it out.
The verdict: yum. They surprisingly don’t melt, and instead become like pudding cookies. It reminds me a bit of creme brulee with its crispy pudding flavor. 
… of course, in the end I was too lazy to toast any more and I ate the rest of the bag as-is (ha ha). 

Finally got to try those pudding flavor KitKats. I was intrigued by the bag’s claim that you can cook them in a toaster oven and they would still be edible, rather than a mushy pile of melted chocolate, Of course I had to try it out.

The verdict: yum. They surprisingly don’t melt, and instead become like pudding cookies. It reminds me a bit of creme brulee with its crispy pudding flavor. 

… of course, in the end I was too lazy to toast any more and I ate the rest of the bag as-is (ha ha). 

18th April, 2014

(via Ms Leah HBIC)